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Kou See Vang

Owner, Manager, & Pastries Chef

Kou See graduated with an MA in Teaching English as a Foreign Language from Columbia International University in Columbia, SC. She is married to her husband Chrisger Vang for going on 11 years. They have 5 children, four boys and a girl. The Vang family resides in south Broken Arrow.

For the longest time baking has always been a hobby. Kou See’s been in education for the last 11 years serving the community as a educator in higher education and public education. She recently left her career as an educator to start a bakery in Broken Arrow, OK. DBK, Desserts by Kou See, LLC opened August of 2021. DBK is located off of Elm and 71st in the Boardwalk shopping center next to Pho 71.

​Growing up Kou See loved to cook and bake. She is the oldest of 7 siblings, and there was always a hungry stomach to feed. All throughout college, she would bake for friends and family. She never intended to grow baking into a business. Turning this “hobby” into a side hustle was an accident.

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"My food is do the will of him who sent me and to finish his work."

                                                           -Jesus, John 4:36

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"In 2008, my sister Sheng got engaged and was getting married. She looked around for a wedding cake, and they were all well above $600. One day she said to me, ‘Kou See, why don’t you make me my wedding cake?’ At first I didn’t think I could do it. I started researching and watching videos. I attempted to make her a wedding cake hoping it would be successful. My very first wedding cake was for my sister. I still remember it. It was red velvet cake. Her favorite! Everyone at the wedding loved the cake and word went around. Many of my friends were getting married and here I was making wedding cakes for the love of baking. Word spread and before you know it, this hobby grew into something more.”

In 2019, Kou See and her family relocated from Charlotte, NC to the Tulsa area. “One thing I miss are the Asian bakeries. There are no local Asian bakery in Tulsa. “What I don’t have, I’ll make myself.”

 

Word spread and people started asking for Asian treats. She started baking out of her kitchen to meet the demands of the community. As the demand grew, it got harder to keep up.
 

“I can no longer meet the needs of my customers baking from my tiny kitchen. It’s time to open a store front.”
 

Kou See and her husband Chris want to add something new and different to the community. They also want to share a part of their heritage showcasing southeast Asian flavors and Hmong treats. “We want to share a piece of our culture and our love of Asian pastries and desserts to the community. We want to create a space where people can come together to eat dessert.”
 

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